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Mysterious 5G Small Cells Showing Up in Cincinnati Suburbs

Homeowners in Greenhills, Ohio woke up one morning recently to discover anonymous contractors unspooling cable and planting orange-colored PVC pipes along a Hamilton County right of way on Sharon Road, straddling the communities of Greenhills and Forest Park.

Technological mysteries are uncommon in Greenhills, a planned community built in the 1930s as part of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal program. Greenhills was designed to be surrounded by a “belt” of nature, drawing people out of dilapidated urban settings and into quiet, tree-filled neighborhoods. Many who were offered homes in Greenhills by the Resettlement Administration never left, and their descendents still live in the homes their parents or grandparents once did.

Considering the slow pace of change and the desire to stay a quiet enclave, it should come as no surprise that many residents are disturbed about the quiet invasion of 5G small cells that will be going up all over town, especially because the owner won’t come forward and explain the project.

That layer of secrecy has brought suspicion among neighbors, even those younger ones that understand how much faster 5G service could be over 4G service available today.

“For me, I’d rather not be the guinea pig,” Andrew Steele told WCPO-TV. “That would be terrible,” Anna Steele, Andrew’s wife, added. “That would be horrible. Also, do we really even need it?”

A closer inspection of the infrastructure being installed shows Verizon is the most likely silent operator, which makes the prospect of millimeter wave 5G service for the community of 3,600 very likely. That could mean a new home broadband competitor in the area. But many residents do not want an option that includes small cell antennas.

Monique Maisenhalter told the TV station she was concerned about cell tower radiation causing damage to health and the environment, although such evidence is open to debate.

She and nearly 50 of her neighbors have signed a petition asking for the construction to cease until “more is known.”

Some believe there is no need for 5G service when 4G works well enough. Others are concerned about property values being lowered by the presence of multitudes of small cell antennas. Others object to the fact the equipment is being installed without full disclosure about exactly who is behind it. Even town leaders are flummoxed, as WCPO reports:

The mayor of Greenhills, David Moore, said he has no say over the fiber line installation because the lines are actually going up across the border in Forest Park, on a Hamilton county right-of-way on Sharon Road.

So we went to Hamilton County engineer Ted Hubbard, who said he, too, is struggling to find out who is laying the fiber and what their plan might be.

“The ownership is a big question,” Hubbard said. “And I have asked that. We are having a hard time finding out who actually owns it.”

Hubbard said several small contractors have received permits to install the lines but won’t tell the county who is behind the whole project.

“Who’s going to operate it?” Hubbard asked. “And who do we contact if there is an issue?’

WCPO in Cincinnati investigates mysterious new 5G infrastructure appearing in northern suburbs of Cincinnati (3:19)

Currently there are 6 comments on this Article:

  1. EJ says:

    O come on people at least give it a chance. It is clear they are doing what they can to make them visually appealing. As for the “radiation” a small tower is going to emit minimal radiation. Be happy your small community is getting the opportunity for better internet speeds. More then likely it was chosen because it is an undeserved broadband community and Verizon or whoever seen an opportunity to see what it home 5G service can do. As for the county guy he can deny the permit if the county requires one, but that will only delay the inevitable as without good reason a denied permit can easily be reversed.

  2. Dylan says:

    5G is coming and will not be stopped. Can’t wait to hear more stories of people getting angry for no reason. It’s the same reason Verizon stopped Fios for the most part, apart from the money aspect. People were complaining that their POTS line was getting disconnected because Fios was available and Verizon wanted to do away with the older copper and because of that, people had to move over to the new service. Well, long story short, a decent amount of people did not want to move over from that because they don’t like change and clearly better service. So as a result, Verizon could not really sell its new service well. Now of course you have advantages with POTS and DSL but Fios is much better overall. But the case with 5G, where people are thinking radiation from these can-like devices will be so high that you’ll get cancer is untrue. It’s simply unproven at this point. But I’ll gladly look at anything pertaining to this, even if it’s from someone like Alex Jones from Infowars.

  3. Ian Littman says:

    On the one hand, having infrastructure pop up out of nowhere is unnerving. On the other, we’re talking about relatively low power cell sites (because a bunch of low power sites is how they’re hitting the bandwidth numbers they’re touting) that are going to make the other broadband providers in the area actually compete for ustomers rather than sitting on their laurels.

    Also, small antennas on houses reducing property values? Do these people have electrical meters? Do they have satellite dishes? It’s such a specious argument.

  4. Matthew Carr says:

    20, 000 satellites are soon to be launched for 5g. The tech being used defies common sense. I did not realize up to this point that the antennas, even in the 5G devices, are going to be able to focus their beams the same way Haarp does. Let me explain how a radio beam is focused, using AM radio as an example.
    Let’s say your broadcast audience is in a narrow corridor (such as a valley in a mountain range). It will make no sense to send your radio signal where it won’t be heard (back in the mountains, where only a few hikers are) so in such situations, multiple antennas are used. The tallest antenna will transmit the signal. Then passive antennas, spaced at precise intervals away from the active antenna, will cause the signal to be diverted in their direction. The more antennas in a row there are, the more focused the radio beam will be.

    AM radio, which ends at 1.7 mhz, requires very large antennas because the frequencies are so low. And low frequencies of the type AM used were not dangerous to people. But let’s say your transmitted frequency is 1 GHZ. That would require an antenna only about 8 inches long. 5G, which operates at frequencies up to 80 times as high as that, requires antennas that are only about 1/10th of an inch long and the entire frequency range is potentially dangerous. You can put lots of those little antennas in a cell phone and therefore cause the 5G beam to become very focused, giving it the power it needs to punch through solid objects (which high frequencies absolutely hate to go through).

    PROBLEM: What if the satellite or tower is on the opposite side of your brain, and your cell phone decides to shoot a super focused beam through your brain to reach the tower? It cannot know where your brain is, or someone else’s brain next to you. THIS IS A ROCK STUPID TOTALLY NEGLIGENT SYSTEM. I WILL NOT USE IT, THIS IS RETARDED BRAIN DAMAGE TYPE TERRITORY, IT CANNOT EVER BE DONE EVEN AT FRACTIONAL WATTAGE.
    AS IF I want a phase array antenna pushed up to my head, shooting out a high intensity pencil beam! Oh, you won’t notice the slowly creeping damage as your brain constantly re-assigns new neurons to complete the tasks that were done by the million or so that got wrecked from an hour long phone call. Those calls will only be sent directly through your brain for 50 percent of all calls anyway because sometimes the tower or satellite is favorably placed so don’t sweat it. You’ve got trillions of neurons to waste, your brain “only uses 10 percent of them anyway” RIGHT?
    If the current batch of cell phones (which won’t kill neurons outright because they don’t shoot a pencil beam) were a problem because they caused cancer, JUST WAIT until 5G takes off

    5g is the type of system that goes in when the people making the decisions don’t give a damn about you. They’d rather have their back scatter radiation scanners sending back high res images of the inside of your home so they can big brother you real good.

    If you think the people pushing 5g want to improve your life, think again, they are the EXACT same people pushing the tainted vaccines. Brain damage may well be one of the “positive outcomes” of 5g that they are seeking, especially with them having the audacity to use pencil beams for it to work. Pencil beams are considered potentially dangerous, they are the radio form of a laser. You don’t have that in a device operating at any sort of power levels around ANYONE if you care about whoever is using it.

  5. Ray says:

    So why is it so secret and when asked what these workers are doing they don’t seem to have a clue or want to talk about anything, so is there more to this? Does it go much deeper where no one can talk about it that is involved?

  6. BM says:

    So this law was passed without any notification to the citizens or their consent.. People need to fight these 5G towers, they are very dangerous! People in California had to fight back because they installed 5g cell near public school and many kids got cancer within few months!! People need to fight and get rid of Verizon phones in Ohio!







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