Home » Consumer News »Public Policy & Gov't »Video » Currently Reading:

If This Had Been An Actual Emergency… National Emergency Alert Test Wednesday

Phillip Dampier October 2, 2018 Consumer News, Public Policy & Gov't, Video No Comments

FEMA, in coordination with the Federal Communications Commission, will conduct a nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) on Wednesday, Oct. 3, creating a cacophony of alarms and warning tones on cell phones, radios, and televisions from coast to coast.

The WEA test is most likely to be heard… in every school, office, and store as nearly all wireless phones sound off starting at 2:18pm EDT. Two minutes later, radio and television stations, NOAA weather radios, and cable, satellite, and telco TV systems, will deliver EAS alerts to their respective audiences.

This will be the first time FEMA and the FCC will deliver a nationwide WEA test, which will measure the effectiveness of using cell phones to mass deliver emergency alerts and action messages on a nationwide scale. Previous uses included urgent Amber Alerts and weather-related messages, but only to specific localities or regions. The government agencies want to know if America’s cell phone carriers can deliver messages to all of their customers accurately and on a timely basis.

The emergency alert messages have no political connection to the Trump Administration or the White House, and were first envisioned during the Bush Administration. Despite that, some planned to mute their phones or switch them off as a protest against the president, falsely fearing he might use the system to deliver political messages.

Tomorrow’s alerts will consist of the following messages, sent using a unique tone and vibration that is not designed to be muted or silenced:

  • WEA: Presidential Alert: “THIS IS A TEST of the National Wireless Emergency Alert System. No action is needed.”
  • EAS: (in English and/or Spanish) “THIS IS A TEST of the National Emergency Alert System. This system was developed by broadcast and cable operators in voluntary cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Federal Communications Commission, and local authorities to keep you informed in the event of an emergency. If this had been an actual emergency an official message would have followed the tone alert you heard at the start of this message. A similar wireless emergency alert test message has been sent to all cell phones nationwide. Some cell phones will receive the message; others will not. No action is required.”

FEMA’s public service announcement about Wednesday’s test. (0:48)







Search This Site:

Contributions:

Recent Comments:

  • EJ: Go away spammers. This guy does good work and don't need you muddling up his page with this garbage....
  • Stephenwek: Hey Look what we gulp down confine conducive to you! an uncommonpresent Honourable click on the engage controlled by to composure https://drive.goo...
  • Dan: "Mega" is always an uppercase "M." The difference is between "b" for bit and "B" for byte. 1 MBps = 8 Mbps. "Kilo" is a lowercase "k" to avoid confusi...
  • Dylan: 5G is coming and will not be stopped. Can’t wait to hear more stories of people getting angry for no reason. It’s the same reason Verizon stopped Fios...
  • EJ: O come on people at least give it a chance. It is clear they are doing what they can to make them visually appealing. As for the "radiation" a small t...
  • Phillip Dampier: Sigh... they find ways around our usually effective spam filters. I manually delete the rest but I was on a computer-free weekend....
  • Joshi: Please stop spamming!...
  • Laughing: Cindy you probably have 100mb service gettin 19MB downloads, that is about right, the big M and little m make a difference. 100megabits gets you aroun...
  • Laughing: Uhhh you are way late on this, net neutrality ended several months ago, where you been, of course everyone is throttling they have full permission to ...
  • Lee: Looks like the spam creatures are slithering out from under the rocks....
  • cindy: I guess I was upgraded to 100MB but for the last 5 years, I've never seen any service beyond 19MB. I own an Arris 6700 which is a modem/router combo....
  • A.B.: Where do you see that? It still says $14.99 on the Syracuse metro rate card. Anyway, I did deduce that calling would be a waste of time since ELP was ...

Your Account: