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AT&T Upgrades Home Internet Plans – 5, 100, 300, and 1,000 Mbps Now Available

Phillip Dampier June 12, 2018 AT&T, Broadband Speed, Competition, Consumer News, Data Caps 2 Comments

AT&T quietly changed their home internet plans this week, dramatically boosting speeds for some of their lower-priced offerings in areas served by fiber, while boosting gigabit pricing by $10 a month in some instances.

Last week, AT&T was selling 5, 50, 100, and 1000 Mbps plans in AT&T Fiber areas. This week, customers can choose 5, 100, 300, or 1000 Mbps. Existing customers will likely have to switch plans to get the speed upgrades.

Prices shown reflect a bundled discount in the Chicago area. Prices vary in different service areas and are higher for broadband-only service. Basic 5 Mbps pricing can range from $30-60 a month depending on area and available discounts.

If you are a new AT&T customer, the company is offering a $50 Reward Card rebate (expires 7/31/2018) and a free Smart Wi-Fi Extender (new or existing customers switching to gigabit service only) (expires 6/28/2018). Here are some other important terms and conditions to be aware of:

  • There is a 1 TB data cap on all plans except Gigabit Internet 1,000, which is unlimited. But you can avoid the cap for $30 extra a month (not worth it) or by maintaining a bundle of TV and internet service on a combined bill.
  • All internet offers require a 12 month agreement ($180 pro-rated early termination fee applies).
  • Prices reflect bundled service combining internet with at least one other AT&T product (TV/AT&T Phone/Wireless).

Currently there are 2 comments on this Article:

  1. Ian Littman says:

    Dunno quite about “not worth it”; if you use a ton of data (>1.15TB/mo average) and don’t need more than 100M, that’s $10 less than springing for gigabit to get the same deal.

    For what it’s worth, business class service can be purchased at a residential location, assuming you don’t want TV, and that service has neither a contract nor a cap. That said, this loophole is much more useful on DSL tiers (none of which are unlimited) than fiber, since of course you can always get gigabit if FTTH is available.

    Another item of note: AT&T apparently rebuilt their prequalification database for DSL as well as FTTH when they upgraded these pricing tiers. They wouldn’t sell me 100×20 DSL last week, and now they will (after transferring twice). So anyone who has DSL now and thinks they might be able to get a higher tier of service would do well to punch their address into AT&T’s site and see what comes up :). ‘cuz I’m absolutely fine paying $60/mo rather than $50 for 100/20 business DSL, given that that’s the fastest available connectivity here until cable shows up.

  2. Also worth noting:

    AT&T’s new advertised price for unbundled 100/100 mbps fiber service is $50 for the first twelve months rising to $60 after that…
    which also happens to be the new advertised price for 10/1 mbps ADSL2 (“Internet 10”) service, and all speeds in between.

    Internet-only ADSL2 between .768 and 5 mpbs is now $40 a month rising to $50, same as the bundled 100 mbps fiber cost discussed in the post.

    (.768-to-5 is the fastest AT&T speed available in about a third of the Census blocks in Cleveland, according to FCC data. Another quarter of the city seems to be stuck below 10 mbps. But don’t worry, there’s no redlining.)

    Isn’t that strange? Wouldn’t you think that really slow service would cost less? Like, a lot less?

    Just kidding.







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