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$75/Month Broadband-Only Pricing Arrives in Comcast Country; Company Raising Rates Again

Phillip Dampier December 21, 2017 Comcast/Xfinity, Competition, Consumer News 9 Comments

Comcast: The Don’t Care Bears are back for more

Comcast broadband only customers in select markets will soon be paying $74.95 a month for Comcast’s 25 Mbps internet service, the lowest-priced internet-only tier that achieves the FCC’s broadband speed standard.

Comcast is among the top cable operators under pressure from Wall Street analysts who argue broadband service is too cheap for a limited competition marketplace, and they have urged providers to raise prices to as much as $90 a month to take advantage of higher revenue possible from a service many consider an essential utility.

Most cable operators are reserving their largest rate hikes for internet-only customers who do not subscribe to a television and/or phone package. Companies hope to recapture some of their lost TV revenue by charging broadband-only customers premium pricing.

Comcast’s Performance tier, priced at $64.95 a month for much of 2017, has already increased to $69.95 in many markets in late 2017. The Comcast website now prices that tier, delivering 25 Mbps service, at $74.95 a month after any promotions expire. An additional modem rental fee of $11 a month also applies if you do not own your own equipment.

The rate changes are all part of Comcast’s annual rate hike parade (noticed by DSL Reports), which gradually rolls across the country and Comcast’s many service areas. Here is an example of a rate hike notice impacting most services in northern New Jersey:


Comcast rates for Performance (25 Mbps) tier, as found on Comcast’s website.

Currently there are 9 comments on this Article:

  1. kaniki says:

    This just goes to prove my previous point.. People are soo worried, and making a big deal about them dropping net neutrality, but the fact that it does nothing to keep prices affordable, is a major problem. Yes, neutrality is good.. But the fact is, if people can not afford the internet, then what good is net neutrality, if people have to drop the internet because they can not afford it. It is like worrying about the price of pineapple in Hawaii.. If most people never go there, it kind of makes it pointless.. and if most people have to drop the internet because they can not afford it, then net neutrality will do nothing for them. Right now, I have spectrum.. But, if they raised the internet price to 75, then I would have to drop them too.

  2. Sean Parent says:

    This is actually inaccurate. Yes, the performance internet did increase in pricing, however it also increased in speed from 25 to 60mbps. The performance starter increased from 10 to 25mbps and runs $49.95, so actually Comcast lowered the price of its 25mbps package by $15.

    • Comcast has increased the speed of Performance Starter in select markets, but not all, and still advertises up to 10 Mbps speed in many areas, which is below broadband speed. Also, the $49.95 price you noted is restricted on Comcast’s website, most notably as available only to new residential customers:

      “Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. New residential customers only. Limited to Performance Starter Internet service. Equipment, installation, taxes and fees, and other applicable charges extra, and subject to change during and after the promo. Pricing subject to change. Service limited to a single outlet. May not be combined with other offers. Actual speeds vary and are not guaranteed.”

      • realbbbb says:

        “Also, the $49.95 price you noted is restricted on Comcast’s website, most notably as available only to new residential customers:”

        This is incorrect. $49.95 is the regular every day price for Performance Starter internet which is available to any customer (new or existing). The verbiage you cited “Restrictions apply. Not available in all areas. New residential customers only. Limited to Performance Starter Internet service. Equipment, installation, taxes and fees, and other applicable charges extra, and subject to change during and after the promo. Pricing subject to change. Service limited to a single outlet. May not be combined with other offers. Actual speeds vary and are not guaranteed.” is the same for any package offered regardless of whether it is discounted or not, i.e. for new customers or existing customers. And, unlike your original post, I will provide proof of my claim.

        Go here (https://www.xfinity.com/support/rate-card/) to access the Comcast rate sheet for any specific area/region. Load the PDF and you will find Performance Starter internet at $49.95/month. The rate sheet for my area (https://comcaststore.s3.amazonaws.com/prod/wk/urc/585bca955bcd10375b2cffe2/high_res/UN0000354_sik_high_res.pdf) has the price on page 4 and there is no restriction listed that the price is only available to new customers.

        Lastly, “and still advertises up to 10 Mbps speed in many areas, which is below broadband speed.” This is true according to the FCC’s (dumb) decision to classify “broadband internet” as a minimum 25 Mbps download speed and implies that anything below that (i.e. not broadband internet) is insufficient for every day use. This is false. I used Performance Starter Internet for 4-5 months and it was more than sufficient to stream (YouTube, MLB.TV, etc.) in addition to working remotely from home which used daily audio and/or video conferencing. Since Comcast usually provisions 20% over the advertised speed, I routinely tested at 11-12 Mbps download which is fine for streaming HD quality video.

  3. realbbbb says:

    This post is misleading for a variety of reasons.

    Comcast has different prices (and different speeds, package names, etc.) in its different regions. So the implication that this applies nationally to all Comcast customers is wrong.
    As others have commented, the price of 25 Mbps internet (regular, non-discount) is already $75/month in my area. It is actually one of the few services that will not see a price increase in 2018.
    This post claims “Comcast’s Performance tier, priced at $64.95 a month for much of 2017, has already increased to $69.95 in many markets in late 2017. The Comcast website now prices that tier, delivering 25 Mbps service, at $74.95 a month after any promotions expire.” but there is no citation/link/document/bill, etc. given for these claims. Comcast increases prices once a year (usually Dec-Jan in most markets) and there is 0 proof that the price has increased twice within the same year from $65->$70->$75/month. In fact, the only proof you offer is the Jan 2018 price increase sheet from central NJ and Performance Internet is not listed on there because it’s already $75/month and therefore not increasing, in direct contradiction to your post. Where is your proof of 2 price increases from $65-$75? Well?
    As someone else mentioned, In some areas (West?), Performance Starter was upgraded from 10 Mbps -> 25 Mbps with no corresponding price increase. Thus, the price of 25 Mbps internet actually went down (from $75 or whatever was charged for it to $50).

    Not here to defend Comcast or their internet prices, but both this piece is long on hyperbole and short on facts.

    • jeffblake says:

      Are you serious? That is all you have done is to defend Comcast!

      First, you nitpick and create arguments about claims the author never even made. For instance, the author specificially wrote “in many areas” — not all. You don’t read very well. Nowhere in the article does he say this applies to all Comcast customers nationwide. In fact, he wrote “Select markets”!

      Second, nobody here commented that the price went up to $75 already. Where are those comments? In fact, the author got the story exactly right for me, and that is the only person I can answer for. I pulled my bills and I was paying $64.95 in February, $69.95 in June and was notified my rate is going to $75 this month.

      Third, Performance Starter is NOT broadband. You may want to quibble with the FCC’s definition of broadband, but the author did not get the story wrong. The standard is 25Mbps and Comcast Performance Starter does not meet it. Your personal opinion about what you can do with Starter does not change or challenge the author’s factual report that Comcast now charges $75 a month for internet access that meets the definition of broadband.

      Four, I went to Comcast’s website and found the exact same disclaimer as the screenshot in the article shows. You, whoever you are, claims a webpage hosted elsewhere does not list the first year only restriction, but again that does not change the fact Comcast’s own website advertises that restriction. You can see it if you visit Comcast.com and select internet only plans and then click on the disclaimer links. It is exactly as it is represented here. You blame the author for a problem that, if it is an error, is Comcast’s fault, not the author’s.

      Five, you claim Comcast is not raising broadband prices in 2018. When I lived in Oregon, rate increases were announced in the fall. My cousin gets his rate increases in the summer, and here I see them in January. So who is making claims without evidence, and will you be back to eat crow when Comcast does raise broadband prices, as they have done constantly since I have had the service?

      So when I read the author’s article, he has every fact correct and in line with what I am being billed for. I’m sure Comcast does charge some people differently, and the author does not claim otherwise. When I read your comments, you have emptied a barn to erect a lot of straw man arguments you created yourself and rudely claim the author is being deceptive somehow. That takes some nerve.

      Enjoy your Comcast service even though they will give you nothing for defending them.

      • realbbbb says:

        Yes jeffblake I am very serious. You’ve got quite a bit to respond to so here goes one-by-one.

        Q1-“First, you nitpick and create arguments about claims the author never even made. For instance, the author specificially wrote “in many areas” — not all. You don’t read very well. Nowhere in the article does he say this applies to all Comcast customers nationwide. In fact, he wrote “Select markets”!

        *I didn’t say that he said it applies to all markets. The actual wording (if you read my post, speaking of not reading very well) was “So the implication that this applies nationally to all Comcast customers is wrong.”. The headline “$75/Month Broadband-Only Pricing Arrives in Comcast Country;” implies nationality as it does not refer to specific markets or areas anywhere. Additionally, it is false because $75/month Broadband-Only pricing has already existed in my part of “Comcast country” for 11+ months. So something can’t arrive here where I live because it’s already been here for 11.5 months. I will grant that the first sentence of the article does say “select markets”. However, the problem is that when this post is cited/linked to by other websites, the title is what takes precedence and the title is what implies nationwide pricing.

        Q2-“Second, nobody here commented that the price went up to $75 already. Where are those comments? In fact, the author got the story exactly right for me, and that is the only person I can answer for. I pulled my bills and I was paying $64.95 in February, $69.95 in June and was notified my rate is going to $75 this month.”

        *That was a reference to DSL Reports (which linked this story) where several people commented (including myself) that $75 for 25 Mbps internet was already the standard non-discount regular price as of last year (or before).

        *So you’re claiming that Comcast raised your rate sometime between Feb & June 2017 and then again in Jan 2018. That seems unlikely as in virtually every market they announce rate hikes once/year especially since many require approval by the local franchise and/or city/county/state. Not saying it isn’t possible just that it seems unusual to have 2 rate hikes within less than a year. Also, you claim a rate hike between Feb & June but you said later in the comment “rate increases….here I see them in January.” So how exactly did your rate increase between Feb & June when you just admitted that you see rate increases in January? Well?

        *Additionally, your anecdote doesn’t match with what the article says (Note: he did not provide a single citation/link/source for his claim) as it says “Comcast’s Performance tier, priced at $64.95 a month for much of 2017,” but you said your price had already increased by June. Then the article says “has already increased to $69.95 in many markets in late 2017,”. So, the website is claiming that in late 2017 (which is vague and not specific) the price increased by $5/month and then again in January is going to increase again by $5/month which would be two price increases in the span of 3-4 months. And for which the author has not provided any proof whatsoever. Yet you claim “So when I read the author’s article, he has every fact correct”. Ok. Sure.

        Q3-“Third, Performance Starter is NOT broadband. You may want to quibble with the FCC’s definition of broadband, but the author did not get the story wrong. The standard is 25Mbps and Comcast Performance Starter does not meet it. Your personal opinion about what you can do with Starter does not change or challenge the author’s factual report that Comcast now charges $75 a month for internet access that meets the definition of broadband.”

        *Yes, by the FCC definition it is not broadband. I’m not challenging the factual accuracy of him reporting that the cheapest broadband internet only package will now be $75 in some (all?) areas. What I AM challenging is that implication from this post (and many others) that any internet service below broadband speed is unacceptable. That’s the whole point of this post and the one on DSLReports.com, etc. to hype up that you will now NEED to pay $75/month for broadband speed internet-only service. This is factually true, but incredibly misleading because (as I stated in the previous post) there is virtually nothing streaming-wise that one NEEDS broadband speed level internet for except 4K streaming (which recommends a minimum 25 Mbps connection). My point is that using a headline/story with “Broadband” as the only labeling characteristic (instead of the specific speed) is sensationalizing because it gives the implication that it is the minimum level of service needed to do anything on the internet above web browsing or reading email. Basically a person reading that post might conclude that the minimum acceptable level of internet is now $75/month standalone and that conclusion would (in almost everyone’s circumstances) be false, because Performance Starter exists and meets the needs of most (but not all) households.

        Q4-“Four, I went to Comcast’s website and found the exact same disclaimer as the screenshot in the article shows. You, whoever you are, claims a webpage hosted elsewhere does not list the first year only restriction, but again that does not change the fact Comcast’s own website advertises that restriction. You can see it if you visit Comcast.com and select internet only plans and then click on the disclaimer links. It is exactly as it is represented here. You blame the author for a problem that, if it is an error, is Comcast’s fault, not the author’s.”

        *I honestly have no idea what you’re trying to say here, so I’m going to try and repeat my point as clearly as possible so that you can understand it.
        *The price cited by the customer ($49.95/month) is the regular every day price available to ALL customers. The text that that author copied/pasted does say “New residential customers only” but that is standard text that is inserted into the “Pricing & Other Info” block on the new customers website (https://www.xfinity.com/learn/offers) for ALL service offers regardless of whether the service is discounted or not. In other words, go to that website, put in an address and it will return “new customer” offers. Some of the offers are discounted for the first 12 months (no contract required), some are discounted for the first 24 months (contract required usually) and others are not discounted at all; i.e. the price you see listed there is the regular every day standard non-discount price. That is the case for the Performance Starter Internet and to prove that, I linked to another Comcast website where you can check the rate card for any service area. You know what a rate card is right? It has the regular everyday standard non-discounted rate for ALL services Comcast provides (internet, tv, phone, etc). So when you check the rate card, you should see that the regular everyday standard non-discounted price for ALL customers of Performance Starter is $49.95, which is my whole point. Phillip claimed that it is only for new customers (which IS what the text on their website says) but I clarified that is NOT true and as my proof I linked to the rate card (i.e. the price sheet) which has the prices that existing customers would pay, which is the same $49.95 figure. Geez, funny you couldn’t understand that given I’m the one who “don’t read very well”.

        *Q5-“Five, you claim Comcast is not raising broadband prices in 2018.”

        *Nope, I never said such thing. Please cite the specific sentence where I said that because I didn’t.

        *Q5-“When I lived in Oregon, rate increases were announced in the fall. My cousin gets his rate increases in the summer, and here I see them in January. So who is making claims without evidence, and will you be back to eat crow when Comcast does raise broadband prices, as they have done constantly since I have had the service?”

        *Eating crow about what exactly? I said that rate hikes typically happen once a year (which is true) while the author (without any type of evidence/source/citation/link) claimed that 25 Mbps internet has had its price increased twice in the last 3-4 months (or however, you want to specify “late 2017”). So I honestly have no idea what you are talking about with this part. Again, I never said Comcast was not raising broadband internet prices. There’s no sentence anywhere you can cite for that. The only thing I said was that in MY market (and some other markets), the Performance Internet (25 Mbps) is already $75/month and will NOT see a price increase for 2018. There’s nothing in that sentence that is wrong/contradictory, so what are you talking about exactly?

        Q6-“you have emptied a barn to erect a lot of straw man arguments you created yourself and rudely claim the author is being deceptive somehow. ”

        You’re accusing me of straw men arguments when you claimed I said “you claim Comcast is not raising broadband prices in 2018.” and in fact, there is no sentence anywhere in either of my posts claiming such a thing. Pot meet kettle much?

  4. Denious says:

    Where and when can we protest?
    I suggest a one day “black out” of all services

    • kaniki says:

      I do not think that a 1 day blackout would do anything.. But, if everyone in that area had their service stopped.. even for one month, then that “would” open some eyes.. And just think.. Stop all services for a month, then sign back up, and guess what.. New customer rates.. so they loose 1 full months income in those areas, plus, then they have to give 20 to 30 dollars off every month, for the next year on top of it.. With that kind of a discount, who cares if you had to pay for a connection fee.. It still would be much less then you are saving as a new customer..







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