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South Korea Prepares for 10Gbps Broadband; Transfer 1GB File in 0.8 Seconds

Phillip Dampier October 14, 2014 Broadband Speed, Consumer News, Public Policy & Gov't 36 Comments

sk 10 gigWhile AT&T and Verizon argue over an FCC proposal that would set 10Mbps as America’s new minimum speed to qualify as “broadband,” South Korea is positioning itself to introduce 10Gbps fiber service.

SK Broadband will introduce its new 10 gigabit per second Internet service at the Oct. 20 Plenipotentiary Conference of the International Telecommunications Union to be held at Busan’s BEXCO Center, in partnership with the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning and the National Information Society Agency.

With the latest advances in broadband technology coming mostly from Asian countries like Japan and South Korea, citizens of both countries are proud of the fact they are way ahead of the United States.

“In the 1960s the world watched NASA send men to the moon and many of us grew up amazed at the constant advancements of the Americans,” said Natsuki Kumagai. “Now the Americans watch us.”

“In my travels to the United States, it is very plain they have lost their way in advancing broadband technology,” said Pyon Seo-Ju. “Internet access is terribly slow and expensive because American politicians have sacrificed Americas’s technology leadership to protect conglomerates and allow them to flourish. Although unfortunate for America, this has given Korea a chance to promote our own industry and enhance the success of companies like Samsung that are well-known in the United States today.”

SK Broadband says its 10Gbps will be 100 times faster than Korea’s current average broadband speed of 100Mbps. Downloading a 1GB file takes 80 seconds with Korea’s average broadband connection today. SK’s new 10Gbps service will download the same file in 0.8 seconds.

The broadband company’s booth doesn’t hold back touting its global leadership in broadband, with the slogan “World’s Fastest, World’s First” seen throughout the conference center.

Currently there are 36 comments on this Article:

  1. Sen says:

    I live in South Korea and have 100m up 100m down fiber to my apartment that I pay 34 dollars a month for through KT. I hear I can get gig for a little more, but I don’t speak enough Korean to explain what I want and my current service is quite fast. I swear the upload makes a huge difference in the modern “share everything” way we use the internet. If they start offering 10g in my building I might have to learn how to say “I want internet so fast it blows my face off.”

  2. Morph says:

    i live in south africa and I have a 10mb internet uncapped which costs in the region of $135.35 (1500 zar) so please dont complain about anything till youve lived here.

    • anon says:

      You don’t look at the worst and say “well at least we’re not that bad.” You look at the best and say “we can do better.” That’s how humans progress. Otherwise we’d all be stuck with your sh*t internet in your sh*t country.

    • KeyboardWarrior says:

      Right now, on speedteset I got:
      2.48Mbps download and
      0.62Mbps upload

      10am right now, no peak/ off peak nonsense either. So its just slow every time.
      Try living in Australia, its a pain in the ass for internet if you ask me.

      P.S – I also pay $130/mo, and this is “ADSL2+”

      • Tim says:

        You know this is overstating the case … unlimited data adsl2 plans are available from $60 in Australia. Average price is about $90

        • Atreidae says:

          That’s if you live in a “class 1” area. I’m still well withn “metro melbourne” yet my exchange only has Telstra ports and their considered regional. So I pay premium for my service. I personally pay 110 a month as bundling is the only way to remove the download cap

    • We’ve covered South African broadband here before. At least South Africa now has uncapped broadband, so count that as a victory. International capacity is what is holding Africa back, just the same as Australia and New Zealand. As new international underseas fiber links continue to come online, I think you’ll see all three countries make major advancements towards eliminating usage caps and some of the ridiculous pricing.

      Telkom’s wireline network is hardly the best either, which is why ADSL remains a fact of life for so many. Just don’t buy into the promises that wireless will be some broadband miracle. As speeds increase and online video becomes more practical, wireless will not be the answer.

  3. Ebola says:

    I could have swore your comment was written at 2gb speed.

  4. EBOLAupYOURS says:

    One day the US will realize that we need to care less about making pro-enviroment companies happy, screw them let’s move forward and let’s kick ass again

    • fakename says:

      @ EBOLAupYOURS
      Yeah because it’s the techfriendly green companies that embrace new technology that is holding it back, i heard fibre uses oil to function. It’s the “pluralist” view of conservatives, keeping the infrastructure networks private that ends up f**king you over as the actors aren’t initially big enough to make those kinds of investments and when an oligopoly or monopoly structure emerges why should they care what you need when they can milk you for all you got without making new investments..?

      Dont be naive, to move forward start taxing those 60$ Trillion dollars that are held in tax paradises by your rich and get the rest of the rich to pay as much as the working class does and there will be enough money to get whatever infratstructure is needed. But then again, f**k it and make another war military industrial complex, banks and the Israelian lobby (yes ISIS gas/oil is being sold through Turkey to Israel and then to Europe, who turns a blind eye, for large sums of money – Israel is currently funding ISIS with more than weaponry).

  5. John Q says:

    Prepare your plugholes.

  6. Malaysian says:

    Well, in Malaysia a 20mbps fiber internet will simply cost you 75USD (250MYR), and korea is considering 10Gbps.
    This is considered expensive for a nearly full developed country. If this problem persist, to become a developed country is only an illusion.

    Anyway, 4G speed can reach up to 75mbps speed uncapped. However, quota system kills the 4G speed.
    A used up quota can throttle back to 64kbps which is nearly the speed of a dial-up.
    The awkward moment when you are on 4G network however speed is like dial-up.

    • Singapore is doing a much better job than Malaysia with fiber speeds and pricing, and competition is what is driving speeds up and prices down. If you don’t have much competition, they price Internet service like it needs to be rationed.

      Wireless quotas are all the rage here in the USA as well, and they gouge, gouge, gouge while claiming there is a wireless broadband shortage right around the corner. In fact, they are just monetizing their wireless network and running it like a cashpoint.

      Speed throttles when you reach your limit are pervasive abroad. Here in North America, they just slap on overlimit fees averaging $10US per gigabyte. It’s quite a racket.

  7. Ahmed says:

    “The broadband company’s booth doesn’t hold back touting its global leadership in broadband, with the slogan “World’s Fastest, World’s First” seen throughout the conference center.”

    This is very misleading, 10gbps is already available to several other contries, one example would be Norway and other scandinavian countries.

    • I think 10/Gbps is available in the USA as well, on an obscenely expensive metro Ethernet or commercial fiber link provisioned by a telecom company.

      I think what SK Broadband is driving at is they are preparing wide deployment of affordable 10Gbps for consumers and businesses over their existing infrastructure, not over a dedicated circuit like you can find in other countries.

  8. Austie says:

    Just a sidenote, in Bulgaria 100Mbps up/down is ~$15/mo.

  9. dbdhddhh says:

    What is the modem being used for it

  10. Ryan says:

    Is this the point where we will see the limitations of the end users technology failing to take advantage of the service? Data through a Sata III cable maxes out at 6Gbps, so even you can download the information, the computer will end up bottlenecking the data as it is unable to write at that speed. Is there faster HDD technology available to the average consumer that can take advantage of this much speed?

    • tycoonbob says:

      While your point is valid, imagine if two different computers were downloading large files at the same time. That cap is no longer relevant.

      Also, what if you were downloading to a device with multiple drives in a RAID array?

    • roy says:

      Nope. the latest M.2/PCIe spec is already at 20gbps

  11. german says:

    in Romania 100Mbps up/down is $7(29 lei) and 1Gbps 13$

  12. Tom says:

    No surprise.. 2 years ago, in the election race of the Governor of Gyeonggi Province it was the official pledges from one of top 2 candidates that he will install free public wi-fi for every bus stops and subway stations across the land… and already some part of the stations are.

  13. I live in Mumbai, India. I currently have a 50 mbps connection for which i pay 1200 rupees a month. Thats approximately 20 usd. So…. Haha!

  14. G Hamar says:

    Why am I not surprised at this – S.Korea is the de facto standard by which all others must now try to reach.
    You hear Comcast & Time Warner Cable saying they are suffering from network congestion of varying percentage of guesses. “We need more money from y’all in order to upgrade our pathetic and out-dated equipment, even though it’s still under warranty, and is still good for at least 15 more years.” “Oh, and thanks for ALL those years of heavily subsidized construction, sucker!”

    So, you have probably figured out that anybody in the USA who is on cable, you are being royally and thoroughly screwed. Yes, I am aware that TWC & Comcast are trying to merge into a new company – if it succeeds and has convinced Congress et. al. that it is for the public good, there will exist a massive monopoly – in essence, you will have NO choice as to who is providing your internet, TV and phone service. While everyone knows that healthy competition is very very good for the economy as a whole, Time Warner & Comcast very much do not want competition, and this merger must not be allowed to happen.
    When other countries are competing to get the best possible for their customers at a reasonable price, TWC &/woman Comcast cannot wait to rip you off at every possible opportunity. So, tell the FCC & your congressman/woman to deny the merger, and better yet,open it up for full blown competition. Let municipalities provide 1 GB high speed at a better price – look at Google’s fiber optic services – $75.00/month for 1 GB internet, or $125.00/ month for both internet @ 1 GB/s & HD television. Lets’ see if Time Warner or Comcast meet or better yet, beat those prices.
    When Comcast is pushing to get municipalities denied the right to set up their own ISP at better prices, it’s a funny thing how TWC & Comcast don’t want ANY competition – PERIOD.
    So, I’ll say it again – write or email or fax your congressman/woman, and tell them to kill the Time Warner/Comcast merger, and to allow healthy competition to happen. Your wallet will love you 🙂
    Good luck,
    G. Hamar
    Vancouver BC Canada

  15. Richard says:

    In New Zealand using Vodafone Supernet (Coaxial Cable. Plan Speeds are 50mb/s / 2mb/s)
    Test just ran from Christchurch to other side of Australia, Perth.

    Ping: 101ms
    Download: 18.2 mbps
    Upload: 1.58mbps

    A bit average really.

  16. SumTinWong says:

    So korea, how much bandwidth do you have to other countries. It’s all nice and good if you got supergigabit but only get 1mbit to facebook/netflix. In sweden bredbandsbolaget does gigabit for about $130 too , but try to download from anywhere outside sweden and your 1000mbit becomes more like 10mbit.

    • Leedar says:

      ‘Conveniently’ for South Korea and other culturally insular countries international traffic doesn’t matter so much, because there is a local version of every type of service hosted inside the country and people rarely want to download much from overseas (because they don’t understand English or any other foreign language, etc.).

      International traffic is most important for small countries, countries that are inclined to use American-based services instead of developing their own, or countries which speak international languages (natively or not).

  17. trendingnewsz says:

    Waw! That 1 GB transfer = 0.8 seconds. 4K movie downloads in less than a minute 🙂

  18. Mike says:

    The U.S. government has been hijacked by murderous psychopaths.
    They seek global domination and, using the power of the U.S. military and intelligence agencies, they’re currently obtaining it.
    The only real threat to them, at this point, is the education and awakening of the American people via the Internet, so, of course, these psychopaths have no interest in greatly improving the Internet in the U.S.
    If it weren’t for the fact that they use the Internet to spy on everyone, they’d prefer that it not exist it all.

  19. Chibunna WIsdom N. says:

    Dear Sir/Madam,

    Please I’m sourcing for a reliable uncapped internet service provider for my cyber cafe business. we are based in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria. Please I wish to know if your company can provide us such internet service.

    I look forward hearing from you.

    Yours faithfully

    Chibunna Wisdom Nwaobasi
    mobile: +2348063627859
    skype: wisdomcn11

  20. chase says:

    Just un f**ing believable…
    They’re national average is 1gb now going to 10gb… And we’re still being sold how grand 25mbs is. With only a handful promoting 1gb as in Chattanooga, Tn or Google FOptics.

    The new 4k is out, we can’t stream it. And by the time we can at a snail’s pace, 8k will be the new standard.

    And it’s all due to US conglomerate and gov bs.
    Ie corporate greed.

  21. BiggJay says:

    Who is Pyon Seo-Ju? You quote him in this article but fail to say what company he is with, what title he holds or how he is connected to SK Broadband or the Plenipotentiary Conference of the International Telecommunications Union. He is a real person? Because other than this article, I can find nothing on the entire Internet on this person and that raises a red flag. Was he just some random person? Did he really make this quote? I am all for fighting data caps and having better broadband, but not for making up a story with made up people making invented quotes.

  22. Sailee94 says:

    here in Russia I pay 10$ for my 100mb/s download and 100mb/s upload unlimited.
    Since last year you can even get 200mb/s for about 15$ but 100mb/s is so fast that i didn’t even think about changing.
    And you can get 1gb/s connection too and many people use it but i don’t trust that company that offers 1gb’s so i stick to 100mbs/ that i have.
    and it’s about 5ms. so perfect for gaming.
    BUT it’s only in the big cities. the smaller the city is and the farther away it is frmo a big city the worse is the internet speed for the same price. but most of the people live in big cities anyway so it doesn’t matter if you are not a farmer or something like that.
    and i haven’t talked about internet with my friends from korea but one friend has 10mb/s internet connection…. that’s about 1.2 megabyte per second…
    i didn’t ask why she has such a slow speed thou. maybe it’s because of wifi + phone being to far away.

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