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South Korea Set to Launch 100Mbps Wireless, Seamlessly Combines Mobile Broadband & Wi-Fi

Phillip Dampier January 5, 2012 Broadband Speed, Consumer News, Wireless Broadband No Comments

While you ponder Verizon Wireless’ latest LTE 4G outage or try to convince yourself Sprint really is selling “4G” service from Clearwire, South Korea’s Sunkyoung Telecom (SK Telecom) is deploying new technology to enormously boost wireless Internet speeds to as high as 100Mbps.

SK Telecom has developed new Heterogeneous Network Integration Solution (HNIS) technology that weds 3G/4G service with any open Wi-Fi network to deliver speeds many times faster than North Americans can get from their wireless providers.  The technology is designed to work without a lot of consumer intervention.  For example, HNIS will automatically provision open Wi-Fi access wherever subscribers travel.  The combination of mobile broadband with Wi-Fi works seamlessly as well.  Currently, smartphones can use Wi-Fi or mobile data, but not both at the same time.  HNIS changes that.

While mobile operators cope with spectrum and capacity issues, HNIS can reduce the load on wireless networks, without creating a hassle for wireless customers who used to register with every Wi-Fi service they encountered.  The theoretical speed of an HNIS-enhanced 3G and Wi-Fi connection in South Korea will be 60Mbps when SK Telecom fully deploys the technology this year.  As SK expands the technology to its 4G networks, theoretical maximum speeds will increase to 100Mbps.

SK is so confident in the technology, it plans to equip all of its smartphones with the new technology starting in 2013.

Byun Jae-Woan, CTO of SK Telecom said, “SK Telecom will provide customers with a data service of much greater speed with Heterogeneous Network Integration Solution, which represents one of the company’s world’s top-level network operation technologies. By realizing the speed of fixed-line services with wireless networks, SK Telecom will allow its customers to experience a new and innovative mobile life.”

Operators like AT&T are installing their own Wi-Fi hotspots in heavy use areas to try and offload data traffic to Wi-Fi.  But customers have to make the connection themselves. HNIS quietly handles this process in the background while staying in touch with SK’s 3G and 4G networks to maintain a consistent data connection.

 

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