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North Carolina: Your Phone Calls & E-Mail Bring “Unwanted Attention” to Corporate Giveaway

Consumers across North Carolina can celebrate their successful effort to protest legislation that would effectively ban community-owned broadband networks in the state.

Thanks to an outpouring of phone calls and e-mails this afternoon, legislators have been forced to delay placing the controversial legislation on the agenda for tomorrow’s planned meeting.  Our sources tell us the reason for the delay was “all of the unwanted attention” the bill was getting from outraged citizenry.

But victory may be short-lived.  The proposed legislation has been re-inserted on the agenda for a meeting to be held next Wednesday.  That means one more week for you to keep the pressure on.

Use this time to tell your friends and family to contact legislators and let them know in no uncertain terms this bill needs to be killed for good right now.  One week, one month, or one year — there is no good time for this kind of corporate welfare to become law in a state that has a long way to go to achieve top-rated broadband service.  North Carolina’s economy depends on robust, world-class broadband.

The state’s phone and cable companies are spending their money on lobbyists to defeat competition, not bring the kind of service communities in Wilson and Salisbury now enjoy.

Currently there is 1 comment on this Article:

  1. Craig Settles says:

    As these next 7 days go along, you may want to change up your talking points so you can swing back around and reach legislators a second and third time without repeating yourself.

    Here’s my counterattack to the Time Warner bill – http://bit.ly/fgfBKJ. This can be broken down into several soundbites for both phone calls and for the comments section of any articles on the bill that appear on newspapers’ Web sites. If you’re really feeling the spirit, use some of these for short Letters to the Editor of your various local newspapers. Your letters don’t have to be long to be effective. Three or four short paragraphs can get your point across.

    Elected representatives hate the unflattering light of bad press, particularly freshmen representatives. They barely have their feet wet and you’re holding those feet to the fire.

    You’re not fighting this fight alone, North Carolina!

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