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Video: FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski Announces Net Neutrality Proposal

Phillip Dampier September 21, 2009 Net Neutrality, Public Policy & Gov't, Video 3 Comments

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski

FCC Chair Julius Genachowski announced a proposal that would prevent cable, wireless and telecommunications companies from blocking certain information on the Internet. A panel of industry analysts then discussed the concept called “net neutrality,” along with their ideas for improving broadband access.

Recognizing the need to expand the U.S. broadband network to ensure America’s infrastructure and economic development, Congress tasked the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) with developing a national broadband plan by February 17, 2010. On September 21, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski delivered remarks on the national broadband plan and other communications issues.
C-SPAN covered the event this morning and had a comprehensive discussion about the state of broadband in America today. (1 Hour, 48 Minutes)

Event Information

When

Monday, September 21, 2009
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Where

Falk Auditorium
The Brookings Institution
1775 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC

Participants

Featured Speaker

Julius Genachowski

Chairman
Federal Communications Commission

Moderator

Cecilia Kang

Reporter
The Washington Post

Panelists

Ben Scott

Policy Director
Free Press

Josh Silverman

CEO
Skype Technologies S.A.

Darrell M. West

Vice President and Director, Governance Studies

David E. Young

Vice President, Federal Regulatory Affairs
Verizon Communications

Currently there are 3 comments on this Article:

  1. Tim says:

    In regards to Julius Genachowski:

    I like how he mentioned that back in the dial-up days, there was competition. But as people move to broadband, that just isn’t the case.

    Also, I like how he said, “People will either view this as pro-consumer or pro-business. I reject that. It will benefit consumers as well as businesses.”

    I hope this isn’t just all talk. I hope they act on what he said.

    • Tim says:

      Lastly, we are the United States of America. We should be leading the world in innovation not trailing it in something like 17th place.

    • I agree, Tim. This is very pro-business for all of those 21st century economy businesses already out there and those to come. Nobody expects broadband providers to lose money constructing and expanding their networks, and guess what, they are not. In fact, the more compelling their service is, and the more variety in speeds offered, the more subscribers they will get.

      I am ready and willing to pony up more money myself for a premium level of Time Warner’s Road Runner service if it means faster uploads and mildly faster downloads. I spent 45 minutes yesterday uploading the video you see above because TWC maxes out their Turbo customers at 1Mbps upload speed in Rochester. It’s 2Mbps or greater in markets where they face more than just a DSL competitor. I don’t need 150Mbps service, but would gladly pay a premium for, say, 3-5Mbps upload service. That makes my life easier and helps me get content on here sooner.

      Businesses trying to service customers can maximize benefits from faster broadband as well, especially to do things like file backups, online video, software distribution, remote monitoring, and applications I can’t even dream of right now.

      ISPs could easily be in the web hosting business much more than they are right now. I could then purchase hosting space from TWC or another provider and they’d earn money from me as a content producer as well, if their package was attractive enough.

      There is plenty of money to be made by providers in a Net Neutral world. Unfortunately, the tendency to try and control and manage everything reduces innovation and ends up hurting them (and us) in the end.

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