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YouTube TV Reaches 50% of U.S. With Addition of 14 New Markets

Phillip Dampier August 17, 2017 Competition, Consumer News, Online Video, YouTube TV 3 Comments

YouTube TV, an online streaming alternative to cable television, now reaches 50% of U.S. residents after the company introduced local TV service in 14 new markets.

The latest additions allow customers to view most local ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC stations as part of their subscription. But YouTube TV has not yet signed agreements with all of those station owners, so some cities will continue to have only on-demand access to FOX network shows for the time being.

The newest cities added:

  • Florida: Jacksonville (inc. Brunswick, Ga.), Tampa-St. Petersburg, Sarasota, West Palm Beach-Ft. Pierce
  • Kentucky: Louisville
  • Maryland: Baltimore
  • Massachusetts: Boston
  • Nevada: Las Vegas
  • Ohio: Columbus, Cincinnati
  • Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh
  • Tennessee: Memphis, Nashville
  • Texas: San Antonio
  • Washington: Seattle, Tacoma

The service costs $35 a month and includes a feature-limited DVR, which in certain cases does not allow customers to fast-forward past commercials. The service also recently added two new channels to its lineup: Tennis Channel, and for Boston-area residents only: NESN, a regional sports network.

An additional 17 markets are expected to be online before the end of summer:

  • Alabama: Birmingham
  • California: San Diego
  • Connecticut: Hartford, New Haven
  • Colorado: Denver
  • Indiana: Indianapolis
  • Michigan: Battle Creek, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo
  • Missouri: Kansas City, St. Louis
  • North Carolina: Triad Region (Greensboro, High Point, and Winston-Salem), Raleigh-Durham
  • Ohio: Akron, Cleveland
  • Oklahoma: Oklahoma City
  • Pennsylvania: Harrisburg, Lancaster, Lebanon, York
  • Texas: Austin
  • Utah: Salt Lake City
  • Virginia: Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth
  • Wisconsin: Milwaukee

Currently there are 3 comments on this Article:

  1. FredH says:

    So – what’s the matter with New York state?

  2. Willie says:

    Yep. I was just thinking. Thanks Google, for screwing over Buffalo, Syracuse and Rochester.
    The other streaming services seemed to be ignoring upstate NY as well. Not sure why.

  3. Paul Houle says:

    Upstate NY has cities that are too far apart for everyone to be covered, but close enough that the stations argue over who has what turf. Utica is lacking some major networks, in a place like Ithaca there is the question of whether we should get Syracuse or Binghamton stations on cable, etc. The long and short of it is that because of these disputes, anybody who is in a place where they would need to stream a local station is in a disputed area and won’t get service anyway.

    Also, Upstate NY is used to being left out. For instance, Uber talked Albany into making a deal so that ride hailing would be illegal outside NYC. Why? Uber is in the business of giving out half-price taxi rides until they can get an IPO. People around the city need to be buttered up to grease the wheels, but in upstate we are worthless for that, so no free taxi rides for us. No competitors, real business or money pit, should be allowed…

    It is my own pet peeve but I think Google has always neglected upstate, sometimes I wonder if it because they are from Stanford and they hate Cornell. Google did not get good aerial photographs of the Finger Lakes region until years after Bing had licensed really great photos from a Rochester firm.







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