Home » Broadband Speed »Competition »Consumer News »Verizon »Wireless Broadband » Currently Reading:

11 Cities Getting Verizon 5G Beta Test; No Details on Speed or Pricing Yet

Phillip Dampier February 22, 2017 Broadband Speed, Competition, Consumer News, Verizon, Wireless Broadband No Comments

Verizon will invite several thousand customers in 11 cities to participate in a “pre-commercial” beta test of its newly built 5G wireless network during the first half of 2017.

The fixed wireless, home broadband replacement will be provided over a limited coverage area in these cities: Ann Arbor, Atlanta, Bernardsville, N.J., Brockton, Mass., Dallas, Denver, Houston, Miami, Sacramento, Seattle and Washington, D.C.

Verizon’s announcement only generally promotes the future potential of 5G service without being too specific about what it intends to offer. We expect the service will be marketed as a wireless home broadband service, not for those on the go. There is no finalized standard for 5G service yet, so Verizon’s adaptation isn’t necessarily going to be the final standard and could change before the wireless provider expands the service to other customers.

“The 5G systems we are deploying will soon provide wireless broadband service to homes, enabling customers to experience cost-competitive, gigabit speeds that were previously only deliverable via fiber,” said Woojune Kim, vice president, Next Generation Business Team, Samsung Electronics.

Verizon’s ability to offer gigabit speeds will depend on several factors:

  • Backhaul connectivity: Verizon will likely choose areas where fiber connectivity is already installed, either as part of its FiOS project or through its fiber connections to cell towers. Because of the very high frequencies involved, 5G connectivity will be line-of-sight and the coverage area will be very limited, within a mile or less of the tower or small cell infrastructure Verizon will depend on to provide service to each neighborhood.
  • Distance and signal quality: 5G service will be distance sensitive and fixed wireless will require the installation of an antenna either pointed out a window or installed externally on a building. The further away, the slower the speed.
  • Shared network: Total available bandwidth on a 5G tower or small cell is shared among all users connected to it. During the initial beta test, speeds are likely to be very high. That may not stay the case as Verizon adds customers to its service.

Verizon has avoided mentioning specific speed tiers, pricing, whether service is unlimited or usage capped, equipment costs, and contract terms. We are also not aware if the service will be marketed by Verizon Communications, the wireline company that also markets FiOS or Verizon Wireless, the mobile operator side of Verizon.

Several of the test cities represent Verizon’s first home broadband invasion on other providers’ turf. Frontier Communications is likely unhappy to learn it faces direct competition from Verizon in Dallas. Verizon sold its landline and FiOS network in Texas to Frontier. Most of the other test cities seem to avoid direct competition with Charter Communications, as almost all are serviced by Comcast. The new 5G service will also compete directly with AT&T in Michigan, Georgia, Texas, Florida, and California.







Search This Site:

Contributions:

Recent Comments:

  • Conan: Live long and invest, Tom Galisano....
  • John B.: What "competitor"? In my area AT&T is currently the only other ISP and they can only provide a blazing top speed 5Mbps down at my address. And if...
  • joe: Its about time ROCHESTER gets gigabit speeds! Buffalo, Auburn and Syracuse had Verizon Fios for a long time (in certain areas of the cities) but Roche...
  • Eric: I believe that I'm one of the people that fall into the 75K+ that will be receiving HughesNet as the solution to not having access to broadband. Gran...
  • FredH: ....and you know what? The worst part is they could give two sh*ts. "Don't like it? Go to our competitor. Oh yeah, there isn't one. Hahahahahaha"...
  • Joe: managers folks - forget this company. worst company of my 30 year career in the industry...
  • Joe: I worked for Frontier over 10 years. They have a Rochester clique that goes back to Rochester Telephone Company - Rochester Telephone Corporation was...
  • Phillip Dampier: I realize lots of people hate Spectrum (or Comcast, or whatever cable company services a particular area.) Historically however, most people will not ...
  • Phillip Dampier: It is very unlikely Greenlight would attach infrastructure to utility poles without a permit because it is an involved and integral part of network co...
  • Rob: I live in Webster. I have been on Greenlight’s sign up list, after paying my $10, for nearly 3 years now. Our neighborhood is at 94% of sign ups need...
  • Ar Be: Not surprised. Frontier Fios has totally ruined the view experience for those of us in Texas. Particularly those in the Dallas / Fort Worth area. Ho...
  • Steve: The article states that Greenlight May find competition tough since Spectrum will soon be offering faster internet offerings. The article ignores one ...

Your Account: