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British Newspapers Giving Away Six Months of Free Broadband

Phillip Dampier March 18, 2014 British Telecom, Competition, Consumer News 2 Comments

free broadbandWhile broadband prices in North America now typically exceed $50 a month, competition in the United Kingdom has brought Internet access pricing down to as low as zero as part of a promotion between BT — Britain’s largest telecom company and Northern & Shell, a newspaper publisher and owner of Channel 5.

Readers of the Daily Star and Daily Express found a four page pullout this week offering six months of free, unlimited use 16Mbps BT broadband service. After six months, the price rises to a discounted rate of $26.50 a month.

Those taking advantage of the offer also get free access to sports channel BT Sport. Readers take advantage of the offer by phoning a toll-free 0800 number or visiting the BT website with offer codes published in the newspapers.

In Britain, newspaper publishers struggling to hold readership are increasingly launching marketing campaigns that bundle broadband, television, and newspaper service into a discounted bundle package. The offers are an effort to stem declines in readership of printed newspapers and can be moderately effective if the price is right.

 

Currently there are 2 comments on this Article:

  1. tacitus says:

    Phillip, you need to remember that none of these broadband offers and prices you quote from the UK include the British Telecom line rental which is now typically £15.95 a month (you can reduce this somewhat by paying a year in advance). That’s $26 in addition to the monthly fee the ISP charges on top of that.

    Apparently the free offer’s small print states that line rental fees are extra. So, the price after six months is over $50/month, although you do get two (?) premium sports channels included.

    • Yes, thanks again for this. The “sports channels” are the same ones every BT customer can apparently access online already, but six months for around $25 a month (line rental) is still a very good deal when you consider American ISPs are trying to charge $60+ a month for 10-15Mbps standalone service, often not including the monthly modem rental fee.

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