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Up, Up and Away In My Beautiful Rogers Rate Increase (Profits Ballooned Up, Too!)

Phillip Dampier January 9, 2013 Canada, Consumer News, Internet Overcharging, Rogers 1 Comment

rogersRogers Communications customers have a New Year’s surprise arriving in their mailboxes as eastern Canada’s largest cable company announces it is boosting rates effective Jan 24.

Many Rogers broadband customers will be paying an additional $3 a month for usage-capped service. Some of the steepest rate increases are reserved for budget-minded customers who only want the basics.

Those subscribed to Phone Essentials, Cable Digital Plus and Internet Lite face a 6.7 percent rate hike, which translates into $8 a month or $96 a year. One thing not increasing is Rogers’ usage allowances.

Rogers Rates Up, Up, and Away

  • Phone Essentials up 7.0%
  • Phone Favorites up 5.2%
  • Phone Deluxe up 4.6%
  • Cable Basic up 2.9%
  • Cable Digital Plus up 5.7%
  • Cable VIP up 2.9%
  • Internet Lite up 7.8%
  • Internet Express up 6.1%
  • Internet Extreme up 4.8%
  • Internet Extreme Plus up 4.2%

Rogers Communications isn’t exactly hurting. Their profits have been accelerating every quarter over the last year:

  • Q4 2011: $327 million profit
  • Q1 2012: $356 million profit
  • Q2 2012: $400 million profit
  • Q3 2012: $466 million profit
Image courtesy: Rick

Image courtesy: Rick

Rogers’ customer Sunfox, who lives in Markham, Ont., and provided the breakdown, is purely tongue-in-cheek about Rogers’ quest for more of their customers’ money.

“I mean clearly something had to be done,” he writes on Broadband Reports’ Rogers Forum. “Any reasonable person can see that $1.5 billion profit in 12 months isn’t anywhere near enough, so it was time to significantly increase rates for their customers.”

Customers who want out can follow these instructions provided by Rogers:

Affected customers who wish to respond to the rate increase notice may call us at 1 888 ROGERS 1 (764-3771).

Residents of New Brunswick who do not wish to accept any applicable rate increase may choose to cancel the service(s) affected by the rate increase(s). Any applicable early cancellation fee, device savings recovery fee or service deactivation fee will apply.

Residents of Newfoundland and Labrador and Québec who do not wish to accept any applicable rate increase may choose to cancel the service(s) affected by the rate increase(s) without any early cancellation fee by sending us a notice to that effect no later than 30 days after the rate increase(s) take effect, as indicated in the rate increase notice.

Residents of Ontario who do not wish to accept any applicable rate increase may choose to cancel the service(s) affected by the rate increase(s) without any early cancellation fee, device savings recovery fee or service deactivation fee, as applicable, by sending us a notice to that effect no later than 30 days after receiving the rate increase notice.

Currently there is 1 comment on this Article:

  1. jim says:

    Please note that Rogers terms of service enables residents of Ontario and Quebec to cancel their existing contracts without any fee!!

    IMPORTANT NOTICE ABOUT AN INCREASE TO ROGERS SERVICE RATES

    Please note that the rates for certain cable television, home phone and internet access services and bundles are increasing on or after January 24, 2013. Customers affected by these rate increases have been notified of the specific details of what is increasing by way of bill message or letter.

    Affected customers who wish to respond to the rate increase notice may call us at 1 888 ROGERS 1 (764-3771).

    Residents of New Brunswick who do not wish to accept any applicable rate increase may choose to cancel the service(s) affected by the rate increase(s). Any applicable early cancellation fee, device savings recovery fee or service deactivation fee will apply.

    Residents of Newfoundland and Labrador and Québec who do not wish to accept any applicable rate increase may choose to cancel the service(s) affected by the rate increase(s) without any early cancellation fee by sending us a notice to that effect no later than 30 days after the rate increase(s) take effect, as indicated in the rate increase notice.

    Residents of Ontario who do not wish to accept any applicable rate increase may choose to cancel the service(s) affected by the rate increase(s) without any early cancellation fee, device savings recovery fee or service deactivation fee, as applicable, by sending us a notice to that effect no later than 30 days after receiving the rate increase notice.

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