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Clearwire Consolidates: Company Pushing $50 4G Mobile Broadband With Throttling Plan

Phillip Dampier November 1, 2011 Clearwire, Competition, Internet Overcharging, Wireless Broadband No Comments

Now all prepaid and contract-free.

Clearwire customers are being informed the wireless broadband provider is consolidating service plans in a move the company hopes will simplify what’s on offer.  Following on the heels of Leap Wireless’ Cricket, which launched simplified pricing last year, Clearwire will now market prepaid, no-contract broadband to new customers effective today.

Broadband Reports has been talking with Clearwire after forum members began noticing changes on some dealer websites that eliminated 3G coverage and dropped postpaid bundles of voice and data plans.  Earlier today, the company confirmed it was getting rid of contracts, early termination fees, rental fees for devices, and activation fees.  New customers will be asked to purchase their own mobile broadband device which will work exclusively on Clearwire’s own 4G WiMax network.  You can purchase plans that work by the day, week, or month.

The most popular anticipated plan will offer “unlimited” 4G wireless broadband for $50 a month.

Gone is the bundled Sprint 3G voice option and the annoying early termination fees customers howled about when Clearwire’s advertised coverage didn’t live up to expectations.  Although Clearwire continues to pitch “unlimited mobile broadband,” their notorious speed throttles will remain for “congested cell sites.”  Customers have dropped the service over significant throttling issues in some areas, which reduce speeds to near dial-up in some cases.

Broadband Reports speculates Clearwire wants to be in the wholesale broadband business, and slowly exit the retail business that has earned them the scorn (and threatened legal action) of some of their customers.

Existing customers will be able to keep their existing plans, at least for now.

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  • Geoge: 1 TB is definitely better than 300 GB to allow subscribers to stream more hours of videos on Netflix. But I still prefer internet services with no dat...
  • Joe V: These ISP executives still don't get it that nearly all customers DO NOT want usage-based billing on last mile wireline. AT&T, Comcast, Centur...
  • Timothy James: Democratic Republic, ostensibly. The entire purpose of the FCC is to define the standards by which entities may and may not conduct electronic communi...
  • Scott: I would 100% recommend my ISP Google Fiber....
  • ryan gomez: Helpful piece . For what it's worth , people a a form , my boss used a sample document here http://goo.gl/VJYqp6....
  • Kyle: We never have lived in a Democracy. We live in a Republic. The federal government is supposed to protect individual rights defined in the Bill of Righ...
  • Timothy James: Well, it's a really dumb endgame, since the country will just end up like pre-1980s Africa. I'm not sure whether the Republicans have a plan beyond "c...
  • Timothy James: By that logic, the FCC shouldn't exist, because state and local laws conflict with federal laws by their very nature. As a federal institution they ne...
  • Timothy James: This move preempts any formal legislation from the FCC, allowing Comcast to lower the cap at their leisure. Meanwhile Republicans battle to strip the ...
  • Ava Cueto: Greetings Eufemia Deemer, my partner filled out a blank OPM OF-306 example here http://goo.gl/QmM7Ni...
  • Eufemia Deemer: Savvy comments . I am thankful for the information ! Does anyone know if my company might be able to find a fillable OPM OF-306 document to edit ?...
  • Jorge Schuldt: Savvy ideas - Incidentally if you want a a form , my boss encountered a blank form here http://goo.gl/J4D1Oz....

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