Home » Broadband Speed »Competition »Public Policy & Gov't »Rural Broadband » Currently Reading:

China Becoming World Leader in Fiber Optics: Explosive Fiber Upgrades Will Overtake All Others By 2016

Phillip Dampier July 6, 2011 Broadband Speed, Competition, Public Policy & Gov't, Rural Broadband No Comments

The People’s Republic of China will become the world leader in fiber optic network deployment by 2016, with more than 50 percent of all fiber subscribers worldwide residing in the country, according to a new report from research firm Ovum.

The unprecedented growth in fiber networks comes through a combination of government incentives, including subsidies and private-public partnerships, and cooperating Internet Service Providers, who want to reach more customers.

In fact, with the Chinese government aggressively pursuing and monitoring broadband upgrades, China will rapidly exceed broadband deployments found in other countries in Asia, including Korea and Japan.  That could allow China to become the global leader in broadband before the end of the decade.

China Telecom is one of the providers that is moving the country towards dominance in fiber deployments, on track to pass 26 million homes with fiber networks this year.

Through the company’s “Broadband China — Fiber Cities” project, China Telecom should pass 100 million homes with fiber broadband access by 2015, with the help of contractors like Alcatel-Lucent.

In smaller cities and rural areas, combination fiber and copper networks plan to deliver temporary speed upgrades with technology similar to AT&T U-verse. But China sees such upgrades as interim, until additional fiber networks can be constructed.

The upgrades are a win-win for China and its citizens.  China’s telecommunications companies are enjoying new revenue opportunities for their wired networks, Chinese citizens will eventually obtain some of the fastest broadband speeds on the planet, and the Chinese government wins an advanced telecommunications network on which it plans to continue growing the country’s digital economy and helping spur additional manufacturing and export opportunities.

So far, China’s large expanse and large rural, often poor population found further inland are not inhibiting China’s infrastructure development plans.

“You cannot become one of the world’s most powerful nations if you can’t deliver basic services to your own citizens,” says Wu Dan, a development coordinator for the Chinese government.  “With clean water, good roads, reliable power, and advanced telecommunications, China’s western cities will grow and become as important as coastal cities in China’s progress.  Internet access is a part of that progress.”

Search This Site:

Contributions:

Recent Comments:

  • Glenn Hull: $299.99 per month for 2GB Speed. Thank goodness there are no data caps! Way to innovate Comcast! #comcastcares...
  • AC: I have basic internet with them. I followed instructions for both twitter and Facebook and no response. That of course is what I suspected would happe...
  • Tim: Hi Kelly, I would like to inform you that Comcast has a promotion called "Xfinity WiFi." Supposedly you can deactivate it on their website but the ...
  • AC: My curiosity would be in Russia's actual FTTH compared to the United States actual figures. Since the oligopolies always use the FTTPR numbers as "FT...
  • AC: And I'll believe that when I see it....
  • Tim: I noticed poor performance from Comcast's rented transciever, so I had them 'upgrade' the equipment to a big EMTA. Same story. Bought a new transcieve...
  • Sharon: So what would be the method if I currently have cable only with TW but am willing to switch phone/DSL? Also, are there any current gift card offers t...
  • Diane: I have found that you don't even need to post anything on Facebook or Twitter. Just private message the info on Facebook. I did that and received a ...
  • Joe V: I have AT&T DSL here in California and have been since 2008. For the most part, their service has performed quite well and nearly trouble free wit...
  • Smith6612: So Counter-Strike, World of Warcraft, TF2, Crysis, and Battlefield are all bad games? They run fine on Linux. Perhaps you mean Linux isn't the most us...
  • Byz: Almost got scammed--then applied the ol' "if the deal sounds too good to be true, it is!" common sense rule. While speaking to the 'Indian-accented" ...
  • Six7One: Make noise. LOTS AND LOTS OF IT. Your state representatives. Public Utilities commission, social media, the companies trying to impose their profitee...

Your Account: