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Updated: Charter Cable Tells Tornado Victims to ‘Look Around the Neighborhood’ for Cable Boxes or Else

Phillip Dampier May 18, 2011 Bright House, Charter, Consumer News 38 Comments

“If your house was destroyed, and you have looked around the neighborhood for our cable box and cannot find it, you owe us $212 and you need to either pay us or make an insurance claim on our behalf.”

Those were the exact words of a Charter Cable representative talking to a storm victim who lost her home, possessions, and yes, Charter Cable’s set top box.  Stop the Cap! reader Jake from Alabama shared the story of his friend Kelly — a single mother with three kids who lived in Jefferson County, until last month’s tornado flattened her home and scattered everything the family owned for miles around.  Kelly is now living with her parents in Georgia and trying to sort through insurance claims, school for her children, her future career, and the cable company.

“She told me everyone was wonderful, offering food, aid, temporary shelter, and even assistance with insurance claims,” Jake writes.  “Everyone but Charter Cable, who immediately demanded payment for equipment that could have blown into the next county.”

Kelly told Jake the other utilities were glad to help suspend service to her now non-existent home.  The phone company is even forwarding phone calls to her Alabama phone number, which now connects to her cell phone.  Nobody asked for a penny, and all expressed sorrow for the loss.  Charter Cable expressed an interest in Kelly’s credit card number to pay for her lost cable box.

“She told me the woman at Charter demanded to know if she was not prepared to pay today, when would she file her insurance claim so the company can get paid,” Jake says.  “Even worse, if she didn’t pay, they would assess late fees and turn her over to a collection agency.”

Cable companies demanding payment for lost or destroyed cable equipment is nothing new.  Stop the Cap! has documented instances where operators demand payment for cable boxes destroyed in fires, even when the customer lacks insurance.

“It’s become a hot topic in Birmingham and storm-damaged areas because relief workers are hearing horror stories from customers, some injured, who are told to start combing through adjacent yards to look for their lost cable equipment,” Jake says.

Bright House Networks, which also provides service in some storm-damaged areas, has been particularly nasty.

Jake notes one local talk show featured a caller who shared the story of a Bright House representative who told the customer she would wait on the phone while she searched the backyard for Bright House’s DVR box.

“It was disgusting, and Bright House told a Birmingham newspaper it was their policy to demand homeowners file insurance claims on the cable company’s behalf so they can get paid full value for their damaged, usually previously used, cable equipment,” Jake says.

In fact, that is Bright House Networks’ policy, notes the Birmingham News:

Bright House Networks, whose service area includes hard-hit Pratt City, also expects its customers to file claims under homeowners’ or renters’ insurance to pay for lost or destroyed cable boxes. “That’s how we normally handle it,” spokesman Robert L. Smith said.

If storm victims don’t have insurance, he said, decisions will have to be made on a case-by-case basis.

“For those who have lost everything, talking to a cable company is probably the last thing on their minds,” Smith said. “We’re not going to pressure someone for a set-top box.”

But in fact cable companies have pressured customers into paying for lost equipment and told they’ll get their money back from the final insurance settlement.

“The problem here isn’t so much that Charter and Bright House want to get paid for destroyed equipment, it’s how zealous they are about getting paid right now, even as people are still wrapping their hands around the cards dealt to them by the massive tornado damage,” Jake says.

The News notes not every cable company is out for customers’ credit card numbers:

Among other television services, AT&T’s U-verse customers who lost their leased equipment in the storm can have it replaced at no charge, company spokeswoman Sue Sperry said.

DirecTV waives replacement costs for equipment damaged in storms if customers continue services, spokeswoman Vanessa Dunham said. If service can’t be restored because of damage to the home, DirecTV offers to cancel the account and waive fees for not returning equipment, she said.

[Update 5/20: Charter Communications sent a statement saying, in part: Charter will not charge customers for missing, destroyed, or damaged equipment as a result of the recent tornadoes. We adjusted our policy shortly after the tornado in response to the large-scale and catastrophic nature of this storm.  We have now confirmed the company is now crediting customers for lost or damaged equipment.]

Currently there are 38 comments on this Article:

  1. Kent says:

    How utterly despicable, and an example of bad corporate behavior pointing straight to the disconnected top. Compared to the size of their overall customer base, they should be willing to forego the small number of relative losses due to such infrequent, documentable catastrophes. That equipment may also be aged and thus worth less, and they’ve certainly depreciated it partially or completely already.

    They perhaps have an even greater community obligation, considering that they are taking advantage of community infrastructure to generate their revenue.

    Eventually, through competitive technology alternatives, new regulations, or simply mass customer exodus, companies like Charter will feel the revenue vacuum and they’ll have no reason to be surprised as to why.

  2. me says:

    How that conversation would have went with me.

    ‘ok you are going to charge me that much for it. I will not use your service for at least 2 years and will be using one of your competitors. How much did you want to charge me again and how much will this end up costing your company when I tell others? your call and I will be telling your CEO in certified letter form.’

  3. Dylan T Hill says:

    Good Morning,

    My name is Dylan T Hill and I am a Communications Specialist with Charter. We apologize for the concern this issue has brought on and we wanted to clarify our current policy on the topic.

    Charter will not charge customers for missing, destroyed, or damaged equipment as a result of the recent tornadoes. We adjusted our policy shortly after the tornado in response to the large-scale and catastrophic nature of this storm. This was the right thing to do for our customers. We understand that this is a difficult time for many in Alabama. We are available through email at [email protected] to answer any questions and concerns.

    Additional Information on this topic can be found here:
    http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2011/05/birmingham_tornado_victims_won.html

    You can also find more information on our team here:
    http://www.charter.com/Umatter2Charter

    Thanks,

    Dylan T Hill

    • Three Zero Four says:

      Mr. Hill,

      Does the phrase “too little, too late” mean anything to you or your employer? If not, it certainly should, and it will mean a great deal more once this story gets more attention. This goes beyond a simple public relations gaffe – this is insensitivity of the highest order, and really should be punishable by law, not just karma or cosmic justice.

      “We adjusted our policy shortly after the tornado…” Isn’t that just wonderful? The fact that there was a policy to adjust is appalling in and of itself. Look, any company that rents out or otherwise provides equipment to customers, especially to those in tornado-prone areas, should know that there is no way to control the weather or what it may do to a person’s belongings. If your company policy includes “tell someone that just lost everything to go look around the ruins of their neighborhood for a cable box,” then you deserve to fail miserably, and in every conceivable way.

      All I can say with any certainty is that this situation is abhorrent beyond comprehension, and I couldn’t be happier that Charter sold my area to Suddenlink. If they hadn’t, I’d be canceling my service posthaste, and I highly recommend that others do the same. No company that treats their customers this poorly would ever see another cent of mine, period.

      Pathetic.

      • Mark W. Jaspers says:

        It’s funny how insensitive a company can be until they are put in the spotlight. Shame on you, Charter, for being so freaking insensitive in the first place. You should be embarrassed and ashamed for being such a scumbag, self-centered company. How embarrassing for you!!!!!

    • spydyee says:

      You know I was almost ready to leave AT&T and bring my phone and other business back to Charter until this little incident. Kiss that concept goodby.

      I was just part of my Church’s relief efforts in Alabama and let me tell you that when people are burying their dead, praising God that they survived while picking through what used to be their home, mourning the loss of friends they had known since childhood, and praising the work being done by churches that they would normally attack at the drop of a hat the last thing on their mind is their flippin cable boxes

      So many of the people that were affected by this storm have no insurance. I helped one lady and she is not sure if her insurance will help them get into a new place to live or not but FEMA is putting her son in a mobile home becasue he did not have any insurance.

      Personally I think Charter should buy an insurance policy that covers their boxes in case of catastropich destruction. Let them pay the flippin insurance premiums for their boxes! If Charter wants their boxes to be covered by insurance let them buy the insurance for their boxes themselves. Pay the CEO a little less and buy insurance. Truth be told they probably do buy insurance on the things and then demand the people pay too.

      The smaller companies, I almost understand (notice I said almost) them being that way but CHARTER!!!!! They have more money than they need. My suggestion to everyone is to BOYCOTT CHARTER in the name of the ALABAMA STORM VICTIMS. When you call to cancel your account tell them it is because of their first response to the storm victims!

      I have issues with AT&T but they just won a bunch of brownie points with me in the way they are handling things for the storm victims. If you can, drop charter and go over to AT&T U-verse.

    • Don Stone says:

      So now that you’ve been caught being completely greedy, selfish douches, you’re going to change? Sorry if I find your company to be less than genuine. As soon as the spotlight moves on Charter will be right back to its greasy and greedy ways.

      The only thing, besides the Justice Dept. authorized monopoly that each cable company operates in, that keeps you guys in business is that Comcast and the other cable companies are just as horrible.

    • J Webb says:

      Now I am certainly glad I dropped Charter. Recently I moved to AT&T U-verse due to Charters rather awful mishandling of my account, and refusal to fix a problem with their lines.

      Now I hear that they are harassing victims of a horrific natural disaster? I truly thought when I moved I would probably go back to Charter… never again.

      You lost my business for good Charter, and no amount of policy changes will fix this… the policy shouldn’t have existed in the first place!

  4. bones says:

    Very cold Charter Cable. Nothing like kicking someone when they are down.

  5. Concerned says:

    I don’t know whats worse. Charter demanding money or the copyrighted picture used for this article.

    • Joseph W says:

      Do you have any evidence showing that they did not license this picture from the copyright holder?

      I would not recommend jumping to such hasty comparisons. But based on the kind of comment you made, you probably wouldn’t take my recommendation to heart.

    • Abdel Irada says:

      You “don’t know whats [sic] worse” between a cable company instituting and enforcing a callous policy that punishes people for having been dispossessed by a natural disaster on the one hand, or, on the other, a noncommercial use of an image that may or may not be copyrighted?

      At the very least, I would say, based on that remark, that you have an imperfect sense of right and wrong. I sincerely hope that you’re not in a position in which you exercise power over anyone, because this is the essential characteristic of psychopathy.

  6. Eric says:

    It’s more likely that employees were just following the book until orders from higher up propagated down – it’s not like they hire people who think for themselves, hell a lot of the support probably didn’t even know there were tornadoes because they don’t even live in this country.

  7. Kyle says:

    I work for a small cable company, 11k customer. We do ask customers file insurance claims on the cable boxes. But I can’t imagine us ever charging someone that didn’t have insurance for a catastrophic event.

    I called a customer once who I noticed their equipment had been in alarm over a month (kinda long for a vacation/power service outage). Got their adult child, my customer had died in a fire. I told them don’t worry about the bill from us or anything.

    I got everything back dated on the account to the time of last payment, cable boxe fee’s waived, account closed, nothing owed. I did have one of our workers in the area verify the house burnt down and there were deaths.

    We are a small company, and 600$ lost is a lot to us, but man we wouldn’t do something like demand money from the child of a dead customer.

    Go small companies!

  8. charter servant says:

    Good Morning,

    My name is backpedaling cable company and I am a secretary that pretends he is a specialist with Charter. We apologize for the concern this issue has brought on and we wanted to clarify our current policy on the topic.

    Charter will not charge customers for missing, destroyed, or damaged equipment as a result of the recent tornadoes. We had terrible PR so we adjusted our policy shortly after the tornado in response to the large-scale and catastrophic nature of this storm. This was the right thing to do for our customers (see we are good guys). We understand that this is a difficult time for many in Alabama. We are available through email at [email protected] to answer any questions and concerns.

    Additional Information on this topic can be found here:
    http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2011/05/birmingham_tornado_victims_won.html

    You can also find more information on our team here:
    http://www.charter.com/Umatter2Charter

    Thanks,

    WE ARE STILL OPEN FOR BUSINESS WE WANT YOUR MONIES SO BUY BUY BUY

    P.S. WE will get out money back for those cable box MONIES AT A LATER DATe HAHA

  9. Different Perspective says:

    So everyone here is so against the “company” that you can’t understand the policy that was in place? In my understanding, after speaking with the company, the policy was fairly simple and straightforward. “Loss or damage of leased equipment is the responsibility of the customer to replace or pay for.” Hmmm, wow, sounds to me like any other leased or rented equipment out there, be it a car, a cable box, or a television from a rental company. How self righteous of everyone on this site to immediately jump to the conclusion that the “god awful horrible cable companies are out to get you” instead of thinking about the fact that the company itself may have had a policy that didn’t take in to account the possibility of a natural disaster.

    Better yet, we allow insurance companies, car loan companies, etc all to get away with telling their customers “sorry, it was an ‘act of god’ therefore you’re not covered,” but God forbid the cable company not have a caveat to their policy that the rented cable box not be automatically excused from repayment because of a natural disaster. Oops, they just didn’t think about that. Or better yet – they did think of that, instituted the policy immediately, but the wonderful “customer service rep” you (and others) spoke to didn’t care enough to actually feel sorry for the fact that the entire area was destroyed. Yes, it’s obviously the entire corporations fault that customer service reps don’t read their email or don’t care what their supervisor tells them.

    Sorry for such hatred of the idiotic comments I see. In all reality, I’m just tired of seeing all of the comments on any article of this sort without anyone thinking about the fact that it may have been an honest mistake. An overlooking of the possibility of this type of issue occurring. Then again, I’m quite sure that no one commenting with such hatred has EVER made a mistake in their life that momentarily affected someone else.

    Long story short – how about everyone think about the cause/effect aspect before jumping on the “I hate [insert company] bandwagon”……or is that placing too much hope in the cognitive abilities of humanity?

    • As our reader in the original story said, it wasn’t so much about getting cost recovery for the lost equipment, it was the zealous way they approached it, further traumatizing storm victims. It isn’t the first time Charter has pulled this. Follow the links in our piece and see what they (and others) have put people through in other states.

      I’m glad Charter is making an exception for victims of last month’s storms. I am much less happy they are not making a wholesale change in their policies, because I’m sure we’ll see this happen again after the next tornado, flood, fire or earthquake.

      AT&T is not exactly the most consumer-friendly company out there, but even they wouldn’t pull some of the antics Bright House and Charter tried before the horrible public relations debacle exposed them… again.

  10. S Pat says:

    Well I would say shame on you Charter, but this isn’t the first time. Why is it all cable, satellite, and fiber providers in these types of areas suck? Honestly even after this I would still recommend Charter over Uverse purely due to the consistency that AT&T has time and time again screwed me and many of its customers over. Being “nice” during one natural disaster doesn’t make up for years of poor service. Now, this isn’t saying Charter is a bunch of “angels” either. In this situation it’s sadly the lesser of two evils. Moving all over the US over the years, I have had the unique experience of having serious issues with Comcast, Time Warner, Cox, Charter, AT&T, and a few other providers. Satellite has just been inconsistent quality and you still need a separate provider for internet. Always techs will be late to their appointments, and it always takes forever to get issues resolved.

    So for now Charter customers, go ahead and switch to AT&T. Just expect to go back in a few short years of black outs, service drops, crappy VOIP service and support, along with a myriad of other issues.

    My advice? Read a book.

    P.S. 2wire hardware is garbage, get used to it if you’re going to AT&T

    • Abdel Irada says:

      Your “advice” to read a book makes far more sense than your long first paragraph of equivocations and rationalizations.

      Neither AT&T nor Charter nor Comcast nor any other cable company I’ve heard of behaves with decency and respect; they don’t have to, since they often hold monopolies on their local markets.

      Enlightened self-interest suggests getting rid of cable, and of television altogether. Ask yourself what it really contributes to your life that you can’t better elsewhere. My family has been without TV for nearly ten years, and we haven’t missed it once. We all have a far clearer understanding of the real condition and prognosis of our species than we did before; it’s not necessarily cheerful knowledge, but conscience finds it preferable to the intellectual anesthesia and insidious indoctrination offered by the aptly cognominated idiot box.

  11. Richard says:

    This story is absolutely false. As a Charter employee, we were told the week of storm that any equipment damaged or lost would not be charged to the customers. Also, that amount doesn’t fit any of our equipment. It’s really a shame, since we’ve been trying to help people.

    • Kelly says:

      You have some nerve. I am the Kelly quoted in the story above. I asked the author not to reveal my last name to protect my privacy. Are the Birmingham newspapers lying too? I am not the only one dealing with this.

      I wrote down exactly what Charter told me word for word when I called to cancel my service. That amount is my final bill with them, and it covers the cost of the box minus the credit I had coming to me when I canceled my service. I am relieved Charter changed their policy and now I am getting money back from them instead of paying them. Are you telling me Charter changed their policy before the storm even struck? Who the hell are you kidding?

      It sounds like you are telling stories to me. I am not surprised Charter hires professional liars after how I was treated. You have no idea what I am going through when you have to move your children to another state and travel back and forth to meet with an insurance adjuster. I am trying to find what is left of my life back in Alabama and comfort my kids everytime there is a storm outside because they are scared to death.

      Walk in my shoes and then open your big mouth.

    • Joseph W says:

      As a charter employee, you might check with your public relations department before trying to approach such a sensitive topic. They should be the official word of the company. You risk your livelihood by attempting to speak on behalf of your company.

      With that said, while I admire your attempt to defend your employer, your tone could be a lot more professional in regards to this matter. One employee in a company is all it takes for the entire company to get a black eye, and in this case the person Kelly dealt obviously disregarded, or never knew about the policy in the first place. That is an abject failure of the management of Charter, and it isn’t a unique situation.

      As a former customer of Charter, their support was not necessarily useful in getting my issues resolved, but i never had to go through the sad situation that Kelly did.

      Check your facts and read the article before you state something is false.

      • Craig C says:

        I work for Charter. I’ll say whatever I want to whoever I want, whenever I want. (as long as I’m anonymous :) ) I’m actually writing this from work, while in After Call, on my laptop, in between torrenting movies and snorting lines of Adderal off my desk. I don’t even have to worry about my supervisor who is over in the sales area right now, trying to get a date or a sexual harassment lawsuit, whichever comes first.

        ALL OF YOU ARE SO ANNOYING – whining your house got blown away booooo hooo. Same people that wanted a full day credit because NASCAR was interrupted by a few seconds of static. I hate this job and I hate you people, so I tell it like it is, even in the face of tragedy. Company Policy bitches! I was getting a kick telling peeps to go Geocashing for your box. Only without a compass, and your reward is avoiding being fined for our refurbished shit box. Look – I just work in the call center, I do as I’m told, Until my 8 hours is up. Management says you pay, I say that shit. The only way I’m going to be nice to “Kelly” is if she promises me a hand job in the motel with hourly rates she’s currently staying in.

        And yes obviously we backtracked, as I recently just got 15 mins off the phone for an impromptu meeting, where were told what exactly “stipulations” needed to be met in order to wave any fee, because god knows there a bunch of dishonest assholes who are busy watching the SPIKE network (in between drinking 4 Loko and anally railing their sister) who will try to take advantage of the downfall of others. Don’t think our investigative team won’t be out there, surveying your destruction, deciding your fate. And yes, eventually we will find ways to **** you back over with raised prices combined with creative corporate lingo. DEAL WITH IT.

        Don’t you guys get it. I’d love to make it simple for you. Just so I can get your annoying TBS and WB watching ass off the line quick as possible. (Except I’m suppose to have a handle time about 5 mins, because I’m supposed to be hawking **** you know you want, if I’d care enthusiastically explain its convenience, in every goddamn call) The reason I act like I don’t care and recite company policy as if I worked on the death squad in Bosnia is this – if a customer has a grievance outside the scope of my very limited ability, I KNOW FOR A FACT if I attempt to escalate it on my own, it will be quickly shut down by a team leader who gives less of a **** as I do, because they’ve been here longer. “No way. I don’t care if the tech really didn’t show up, we’re not rescheduling her apt until the next one in the system, which is 9 DAYS FROM NOW.” That’s why I’m emotionless to people like “Homeless Kelly” so they take matters into their own hands and demand a supervisor. Because guess what, THEN THEY WILL DO IT (Usually)

        Its not like I can change the world. Get real scrots, I can’t even go lunch when I want. You might respond to this post, “well if it makes you unhappy why are you doing it?” A man has got to survive after all. And although this post is extremely mean spirited, if you’re a nice person, then I am generally extremely responsive and want to assist you in anyway I can. Except for that time a lovely couple called to cancel their service because their house burned down, and I transferred them to the Retention department instead of canceling their service. Because putting in a cancellation takes a lot of work.

        PS – When I put you on hold for 3 minutes because I claim I’m looking into your issue. I’m really just browsing the internet or IM’ing a work buddy, because I already know the answer to your question. But I enjoy wasting your time, and… especially mine.

    • Abdel Irada says:

      I don’t believe you for a second. Your post is entirely too consistent with the behavior of paid corporate “personas” who try their best to defuse well-merited public outrage by posing as something they aren’t.

      This phenomenon is becoming a disturbing commonplace. More and more, every article I see that rebukes a corporate or governmental entity, reports on economic injustice, discusses sensitive issues of industrial pollution and the environment or advocates either higher taxes or more regulation of business is followed by comments in which such professional trolls are well represented.

      Readers beware: Astroturfing is far more sophisticated than you might think. The corporate shills labor assiduously and without a trace of remorse to manufacture, like able if unscrupulous attorneys, something that looks to the unwary like reasonable doubt. They also strive to apply psychological techniques to manipulate the audience: For example, they are alert and industrious in finding articles like this one, often arriving in time to make the first comment and set the tone, and they are tenacious, often ready to keep arguing until they wear down sincere commenters, most of whom don’t have the luxury of making a living on the comment boards; thus they establish primacy and recency, assuring that their blandishments are better retained in readers’ memory than the remonstrations of the honest.

      Anyone who hasn’t heard about this should take a moment to study the issue. It’s really quite sobering.

  12. Mynx says:

    that really disturbed me so i did some research on it…

    http://www.wsfa.com/Global/story.asp?S=14672228

    an excerpt: A statement from Charter Communications comments about the storm crisis and its response. “The tenacity of the April 27 tornados in Alabama came unexpectedly for us all. Charter customers throughout the state have suffered tremendous personal loss and property damage as a result of the storm. Throughout this difficult time, Charter has stood by our customers – and the state of Alabama – as we all work towards recovery,” said Kristina Hill, Senior Director of Communications. Charter donated $50,000 to the American Red Cross in Alabama and its staff has volunteered locally to assist, she said. “Realizing that this is a challenging time for our customers, we have waived fees for equipment that was lost, damaged, or destroyed as a result of the tornado. Charter’s customer care team is standing by at 1-888-438-2427 to answer questions and to schedule service calls. “Charter employees live and work throughout Alabama. This is our home, too. We stand by our customers and the state of Alabama as we all work to restore, rebuild, and renew.”

    Attorney General Strange said that consumers who have concerns or difficulties may contact his Office of Consumer Protection by calling toll-free 1-800-392-5658 or by writing to 501 Washington Avenue, Alabama 36130. Consumers may file a complaint online at http://www.ago.alabama.gov/consumer_form.cfm.

    INFORMATION SOURCE: Attorney General’s Press Office

  13. Nym says:

    Their real customers are their shareholders, everyone else is just a sheep.

  14. wp[pdf says:

    boof! we all fall down

  15. Dylan T Hill says:

    Good Morning,

    We would like to provide some additional feedback from our local Alabama market in regards to the situation:

    “Alabamans take care of our own. In the hours following the storms, Charter’s Alabama team was focused on the devastation that was left and ensuring the safety of our employees as they immediately began the job of restoring communication services to customers. Our disaster plan was in place and everyone was focused on taking care of very basic human needs. Unfortunately, some time elapsed before our Care agents got word to adapt our equipment policy, as we have in the past during other disastrous storms . So customers who called immediately following the storm were misinformed. The policy changed to reflect the need and Care agents conveyed that to customers. Our employees continued to delivered water, tarps and other supplies to storm victims and help the Red Cross out with financial aid. The policy was changed because it was the right thing to do.”

    We sincerely apologize for the misinformation that was provided and if Kelly or anyone else have additional questions you are welcome to contact us directly at [email protected]

    We also hope that everyone in the affected areas are doing alright and our thoughts go out to those that were impacted by these violent storms and tornados.

    Thanks,

    Dylan T Hill
    http://www.charter.com/Umatter2Charter

  16. Mike says:

    Submitted this to the Consumerist and it just got posted on the front page. Nice to know it was fixed even before they got involved, but pretty sickening that it actually took a media outcry for them to act like human beings. I really really really hate Charter.

  17. Nighthawke says:

    Disconnects between the various departments are frequently to blame for these kind of incidents and gaffes. Someone needs to break those walls down and get some TALKING going on between those departments, especially the line animals that are usually the first ones to catch hell for the lag in policy changes.

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