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Hong Kong Broadband: 1/1Gbps for $26/Month — 100/100Mbps for $13/Month

Phillip Dampier April 15, 2010 Broadband Speed, Competition 8 Comments

HK Broadband offers 100% Fiber Optic service to residents of Hong Kong

Next time you pay your broadband bill, consider what you are getting for your money.

Then consider Hong Kong residents can now buy 1,000Mbps symmetrical broadband service for $26 per month.  Symmetrical broadband offers identical upstream and downstream speeds, so transferring large files back and forth becomes an afterthought, not a nuisance.

This week Hong Kong Broadband Network (HKBN) introduced wide availability of its mega-fast 1/1 gigabit per second service at prices that most American broadband providers won’t match for slow “lite” or “budget” tiers.  The new gigabit service joins an even more affordable 100/100Mbps broadband service HKBN sells for $13 a month.

“Symmetric 1 Gbps broadband at US$26/month (HK$199) is a global breakthrough service, and is by far the best value in terms of cost per Mbps in Hong Kong. We are pleased to contribute towards making Hong Kong a global Fibre Oasis,” said June Lam, Associate Director, Marketing, HKBN.

Currently there are 8 comments on this Article:

  1. Tim says:

    And the USA continually keeps going to the back of the line…15th in the world in speed but dropping fast!

  2. Scott says:

    If the baby boomers who run the U.S.A. don’t wake up soon, America will be irrelevant technology-wise in less than a decade.

  3. TM says:

    America, it seems, is too busy looking back at the Super Power we were rather than looking forward at how to maintain that position. It’s good to keep one eye on the past so you don’t make the same mistakes again. But to look away from the future like we have done, is sending us off course.

    This applies to far more than broadband speed, coverage and price.

  4. jr says:

    Cable companies here spend all their money on executive salaries instead of upgrades

  5. Jim says:

    This is really depressing to me. And the really sad thing is that there’s nothing we can do to fix our broken system without the help of those who broke it in the first place and they don’t have the desire to fix it. This is where I’d be perfectly happy with some “socialism.” There is something to be said about capitalism, but when you have no option other than crap service, that’s not capitalism. It’s painfully obvious these companies are going to need to be forced to play fair. Maybe ending the virtual monopolies ISPs have will help elevate competition. I don’t know about anyone else, but I’m fine with a ISP putting lines in my yard (providing they put everything back the way it was, relatively) for a few weeks if it means we get some actual competition.

    • I believe municipal broadband will offer some communities a way forward. I also think the public policy impact of the Google Think Big With a Gig plan will carry larger implications for America’s broadband landscape than people realize.

      When Google pulls off wiring a community/communities for fiber service at reasonable prices, they will finally bury the industry talking point that fiber is too expensive and broadband speeds aren’t important and the price we charge is “fair.”

      Look at what this website has managed to do in fighting off the nation’s second largest cable operator’s overcharging schemes. We successfully beat Frontier back once as well, chased North Carolina legislators down the hallways to stop their industry friendly legislation, and are engaging to fight Frontier yet again on behalf of residents in a small community in Minnesota. When people get involved, fight for what they believe is right, and hassle their legislators in a unified front to preserve broadband successes in this country, victories can be achieved.

      I look at illustrative examples of broadband in other countries as just more evidence to counter industry propaganda and destroy their baseless talking points.

      I don’t believe the free market works well when there is an effective duopoly for broadband, so we need some regulatory changes to force open markets and gin up competition, even if it comes from municipalities. Just make sure there are no usage caps. 🙂

  6. Victor says:

    Here in USA Comcast, At&t, Verizon, Frontier and others try to limit us with Meter Caps and super high fees every day. They love Cap! So Sad!

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